[EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams


  • Paperback
  • 304
  • Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture
  • Heather Andrea Williams
  • English
  • 15 October 2020
  • 9780807858219

6 thoughts on “[EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams

  1. says: Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters Download ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ✓ Heather Andrea Williams Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

    Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams I read this book for my research This was an enjoyable if you love history because Williams found so many wonderful stories even though these stories are steeped in a painful time in history However this book makes me proud to be an educator

  2. says: [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters

    Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams This research is a much needed contemporary history of the education of African Americans in the South from slavery through reconstruction and the beginnings of the common public school It addresses the uestion from the local 'grassroots' perspective Williams explores how blacks sacrificed to build schools pay for teachers advocate for thei

  3. says: [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams

    [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture Reading this book made me think of Thomas Sowell and that is generally a good thing  The writer of this book had an obvious interest in promoting the agency and self regard of black people as it relates to educa

  4. says: [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

    [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams When I first started this book I was having trouble getting into itI was thinking it wasn't as good as her other book But once I got intothe third chapter or so it was very interesting and I wound up readingthe whole book in about 24 hours I was interested in the book because there is educational background in my familyin terms of establishing schools for the community childrenAs usual Heather Williams brings to light a lot of Af

  5. says: [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams

    [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters Very interesting book Williams does a good job researching and writing about the challenges faced by slaves and freedpeople to learn to read and write The book is somewhat repetitive in recounting the challenges but an important read nonetheless and sheds light on the difficulties the African American community has faced in clawing its way o

  6. says: Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters Download ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ✓ Heather Andrea Williams Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

    Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture [EBOOK / KINDLE] Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture by Heather Andrea Williams Heather Andrea Williams ✓ 5 characters Eye opening story of education in the pre war wartime and antebellum South among African Americans Themes in it echo my research project right now

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Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture Free download ¸ 5 He first teachers of other freedpeople Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid Williams argues that by teaching building schools supporting teachers resisting violence and claiming education as a civil right African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners. Reading this book made me think of Thomas Sowell and that is generally a good thing The writer of this book had an obvious interest in promoting the agency and self regard of black people as it relates to education I could not help but think of the wide disconnect that exists between the attitudes that black children and adults demonstrated in this book at least indirectly through the sources cited herein and the laziness and lack of interest in education that the author here occasionally ascribes to poor southern whites After all the people the author writes about and praises were so passionate about the role of education in helping them rise from poverty and dishonor that they risked life and limb both during and after slavery teaching others once they had learned a little about reading and showing a great deal of initiative in demanding schools and textbooks and ualified teachers If only such initiative can be shown now by many of those who whine about structural racism and view themselves as helpless to improve their position in the face of imagined white privilege This book is a stinging rebuke to such a lack of personal responsibility and acceptance of agency for one s educationThe author organizes this roughly 200 page book into nine chapters that are organized in generally chronological but also topical order The author begins with acknowledgements and an introduction that posit the agency of blacks in the 19th century in their search for education After that the author begins with a chapter on the secretive and often illegal education that slaves sought before freedom 1 The author then discusses the coveted possession of literacy in the early days of freedom 2 There is a chapter on the clamor among black soldiers for education 3 during the Civil War and the advocacy for education among blacks that was widespread across gender and age boundaries 4 The author talks about the local grassroots organization of schools for blacks 5 in the postwar period and also the role of black teachers in schools for blacks during Reconstruction 6 This leads to a discussion of the role of textbooks in schools for freed slaves 7 as well as the diverse identities of students in those schools which included poorer whites who were unable to find schools for themselves 8 The book then ends with a discussion of the common school systems for black and white students 9 that threatened white supremacy in the South after which there is an epilogue and an appendix that deal with the uestion of law and education as well as the usual notes bibliography and indexI am ultimately not sure whether or not the author wishes to view this historical examination of the education of blacks as having relevance to the contemporary period The author is pretty unsparing about the racialist assumptions that white reformers had about the superiority of whites and the favoritism that both slaveowners and white Northerners showed to lighter skinned blacks who uite understandably struck them as being like them The author seems to view favoritism towards others who are like them as a problem when it comes to the behavior of whites although such tribalistic behavior is by no means only something that one finds among lighter skinned human beings and is indeed a large part of the problem of contemporary identity politics At any rate anyone who reads this immensely detailed book with any shred of enthusiasm for the prospect of slaves and freed people seeking education as a means of raising their status and as a means of provoking poor whites to seek education to keep pace themselves and that audience certainly includes me will find much to enjoy and celebrate here Indeed all genuine education is self education in the sense that we cannot be educated without our consent and our longing and search for education is an aspect of taking responsibility for our place in the world and that is something that we can endorse no matter who seeks to learn and grow

Download ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ✓ Heather Andrea Williams

Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture Free download ¸ 5 In this previously untold story of African American self education Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery during the Civil War and in the first decades of freedom Self Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African America. I read this book for my research This was an enjoyable if you love history because Williams found so many wonderful stories even though these stories are steeped in a painful time in history However this book makes me proud to be an educator

Summary Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

Self Taught African American Education in Slavery and Freedom The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture Free download ¸ 5 Ns emerged into plans and action once slavery endedEnslaved people Williams contends placed great value in the practical power of literacy whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acuire literacy and when slavery ended they became t. This research is a much needed contemporary history of the education of African Americans in the South from slavery through reconstruction and the beginnings of the common public school It addresses the uestion from the local grassroots perspective Williams explores how blacks sacrificed to build schools pay for teachers advocate for their own education and how these individuals striving for freedom inspired a movement for education across the South Poor whites seeing blacks entering schools were driven to anger jealousy violence and imitation Some whites enrolled in freedpeoples schools as they believed them superior to the poor white schools in the neighborhood if there were anyWilliams work could definitely use an update and a broadening of perspective Her research is education centric she does not consider broader social forces at play in her analysis or if she does she brings them up for a paragraph before moving on In other words she does not string her analysis along broader themes of raceism freedom democracy etc all at play during this period Education was in fact the very foundation of new conceptions of democracy it was foundational to the ideology of freedom and it was not coincidental that freedpeople associated education with a way up in the world They were in some ways appropriating a republican ideology of free labor that valued education as foundational By not considering the broader context the North the new forces of industrialization and the changing meaning of labor contestations of freedom and so on Williams point is less forceful less connected However as descriptive work and as the contemporary 21st century work on the subject this is definitely must reading